TeachMeet Leicester (1 October 2013)

I attended my first TeachMeet at New College Leicester one dark night in October.  TeachMeet is a forum for teachers to share ideas and good practice.  I attended as an observer only – not quite brave enough to present!  The evening comprised about 12 short presentations – either long (7 minutes) or short ( 2 minutes).  The event was organised by Dan Williams (@danwilliams1984), and it had a wild west theme: presenters were awarded sheriffs badges and/or shot with a (toy) gun if they ran overtime!  As a librarian from higher education – I was in a minority of one.  Most of the teachers were from primary or secondary schools, with a few from colleges of further education.

There were some excellent presentations – I was particularly struck by the imagination and enthusiasm that some teachers have for their both their teaching practice and the pupils in their classroom.  For example, at one primary school 4 year olds in reception class learn computer logic and programming on iPads using apps.  Other schools use Skype to connect with schools across Europe and America, and the children learn about different geography and languages by peer-to-peer learning.  It certainly made me question if I can do more with technology to connect with my distance learning students!

My favourite presentation was about using Twitter to teach Spanish in secondary school.  @wrennmfl encourages students to communicate in Spanish via social media.  Students are asked to summarise learning, ask questions, and comment on news items in 140 character tweets.  Students are also encouraged to follow the Twitter accounts of Spanish speaking role models including Cesc Fabregas, Rafael Nadal and our own Gary Linekar.  Twitter has increased student engagement with learning, both inside and outside the classroom, and helped to foster a sense of community among the students, particular among ‘hard-to-reach’ teenaged boys.

I also enjoyed the presentations and discussions about using Skype in the classroom.  Some teachers had paired their classes with others around the world, and used Skype as their primary form of communication, taking the concept of penpals a stage further.  A primary school had exchanged Christmas cards and shared traditional Christmas carols; and a secondary school had arranged an international dance competition as part of a PE class.  Others had used Skype to invite experts into their classrooms.  This ranged from getting guest lecturers, to watching a behind the scenes tour of the British Museum.

Finally, there was some interesting work with Google Drive and the use of Google Forms to assess learning (diagnostic, formative and summative) in a further education college.  While I am cautious about pushing Google as a learning platform, many of the ideas could be replicated in Blackboard or other virtual learning environments.

The TeachMeet lasted about 2 hours in total, with a break for cowboy themed refreshments (wagon wheels and strawberry shoelaces/lassos) at half time.  Also in attendance was a Clive Francis a conference artist, who made a visual cartoon record of the evening.  At the end of the evening, we voted for our favourite presentation (with cowboy stickers), and a prize was awarded to the winning speaker.  The TeachMeet was not always directly relevant to libraries or higher education, but has certainly opened my eyes to new possibilities in education.  I would like to attend another, and also maybe try a LibTeachMeet …

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